The journalist discusses her bohemian journeys and new book Gypset Travel.

Gypset is...

A new kind of luxury that fuses the sophistication and speed of the jet set with the wiliness of a gypsy. It's flexible, spontaneous and ferrets out the untested and untried.

The perfect gypset destination…

Should be two to three hours from an international airport and a little hard to get to. If something is geographically exclusive, it's an initiation to get there. Also, there needs to be a local culture that's intact, not people coming in and building their fantasy land.

Your packing essentials…

A pashmina (use it as a blanket or a sweater), a pair of Havaianas, a bikini and good sunblock. All the places in my book are in warm, equatorial places, not because there aren't gypsetters in snowy areas but because I don't like the cold. It makes packing a lot easier.

The travel book you love to give…

“The Oblivion Seekers” by Isabelle Eberhardt and “The Canterbury Tales” by Chaucer.

Travel tip…

As a rule of thumb, I never ask people about their work — or their last names, either. It's nice to keep things abstract, be in the moment and explore the mind outside of the traditional world. Reinventions are possible.

Recommendation for a fall getaway…

Let's see, if September, the Aeolian Islands in Italy are fantastic. Go to the more rustic islands — Panarea, Filicudi, Stromboli.

Most memorable experience while writing Gypset Travel…

Cabo Polonio, “Uruguay,” was a really wild experience. It's completely off the grid. You have these fantastic homes that are the size of a bedroom! There's a replica of a Tuscan villa, but it's only around 200 square-feet because you have to carry the materials in — no roads, and cars aren't allowed. Everything is lit by candles — no electricity — and people wander by flashlight or torches.

And the book that changed your life…

“The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” by Tom Wolfe

How did you come up with the term?

I was at the Milan Furniture Fair doing a story for Elle and had to describe this Bottega Veneta camping cot. I had to do it in two or three words — the space was very economical — and called it “gypset.”

Julia Chaplin at Castilla de Dracula in Todos Santos, Mexico. Photograph courtesy of Assouline.